Archive for September, 2014

29 September, 2014

My PgConf.EU Schedule

by gorthx

Yep, I’m headed to Madrid! I’ll be reprising my Autovacuum talk from SCALE, and am really looking forward to meeting some new folks. I’ll be helping out at the conference in some capacity, so come say hello.

For reference, the conference schedule is here:
http://www.postgresql.eu/events/schedule/pgconfeu2014/

Other talks I plan to attend:

Wednesday:
Performance Archaeology sounds pretty cool!

Joe Conway’s Who’s the Fairest of Them All, since I didn’t get to catch it at PgOpen.

Open Postgres Monitoring

I’m interested in hearing Devrim’s opinions about Pg filesystems. (And pgpool, but that’s a discussion for the pub. ;) )

Next, a case study from Dimitri, this one on backups. (This sounds like one of those talks that will have people muttering “oh crap!!” and running out of the room.)

Thursday:
Dmitri again, on pgloader, because I always have data loading needs.

I want to see all three sessions in the next time slot (Logical decoding, PostGIS, and authentication), so I’ll wait until the day of to make up my mind.

Hmm Bruce’s indexing talk, or Christophe’s on Data Corruption?

I hope I never have to join 1 million tables.

Locks unpicked, Analytical Postgres, and of course the Lightning Talks will finish out the day.

Friday:
Unit testing with PgTAP

Disaster Planning and Recovery

Logical decoding for auditing

Replication of a single database? Sign me up!

Saturday I plan to do touristy things: check out the park, a museum or two, and hopefully a fabric shop, before my flight out. If anyone has any recs, I’d love to hear them.

22 September, 2014

PgOpen 2014 – quick recap

by gorthx

Many thanks to the speakers, my fellow conference committee members, and especially our chair, Kris Pennella, for organizing the best PgOpen yet.

(Speakers: please upload your slides or a link to your slides to the wiki.)

I came back with a big to-do/to-try list: check out Catherine Devlin’s DDL generator, familiarize myself with the FILTER aggregates in 9.4, make a web interface to the PDXPUG talks db (on a tiny little heroku instance), re-do the examples from the PostGIS tutorial, etc. Plus apparently I have a tiny little patch to write (flw). Many thanks to Denish Patel of OmniTI and Will Leinweber of Heroku for the personalized help sessions.

All in all, it was a wonderful conference & I’m looking forward to 2015’s version. If you’re interested in being on next year’s committee, let us know at program2014 at postgresopen.org.

15 September, 2014

PDXPUGDay Recap

by gorthx

Last weekend we held the biggest PDXPUGDay we’ve had in a while! 5 speakers + a few lightning talks added up to a fun lineup. About 1/3 of the ~50 attendees were in town for FOSS4G; I think the guy from New Zealand will be holding the “visitor farthest from PDXPUG” for a good long while. Some folks from SEAPUG daytripped down (hi!) and we made plans for PDXPUG to road trip up there, probably for next year’s LinuxFestNW.

My highlights:
HSTORE, XML, JSON, and JSONB – David Wheeler
– Pg’s XML features are pretty neat, but I still think XML needs to DIAF. Perhaps that’s just my previous experience speaking.
– We renamed the HSTORE containment operator (@>) to “ice cream cone operator”, courtesy Mark Wong.
– Operations on JSON are slower than on HSTORE. That’s interesting.
– The storage overhead for JSONB is higher than for regular JSON, because it doesn’t compress very well. Josh B took an audience vote on improving compression at the expense of slowing down operations, and it was pretty evenly split.
– As usual, David included benchmarks and gave good overviews of when to use which data type.

Snapshotted Data Versioning – Eric Hanson
Eric gave a talk about this at PDXPUG last year and was showing an updated version of what Aquameta’s up to. Eric’s philosophy is “make everything data, and then make a UI for it”.
– Implemented FUSE for Pg, bidirectional, so you can change your data by making updates directly in the database or by editing a text file on the filesystem. I believe this was described as “perverse” by a certain audience member.

Data Near Here – Veronika Megler

– Another update to a previous PDXPUG talk
– Scientists report that they spend up to 80% of their time just finding data relevant to their research. Not collecting – locating previously saved data. What a time sink.
– Parsers for each data format have to be custom coded.

Portal Update – Kristin Tufte
– Another example of pulling data from many different sources in many “unique” formats!
– Current research on pedestrian counts uses the crosswalk buttons as a potential method to count pedestrians.
– I’d like to get ahold of the traffic light data, to see if the light at 32nd and Powell really is the longest light in Portland, or if that’s just my imagination.

AWS Faceoff (Cloud Shootout!) – Josh Berkus
I don’t care too much about Postgres on AWS – if I’m going to go that route, I’ll buy my own hardware, TYVM.
– RDS has a limited number of extensions installed, and PL/R isn’t one of them.* They did just add pg_stat_statements, which is cool. The Amazon support people are taking requests, and are attentive to the community, according to Josh. (I don’t have enough experience with that to have an opinion.)
– performance on RDS just isn’t that great; Josh got 325 TPS read/write, and 1430 TPS read-only.
– Then there was the cost comparison; RDS and Heroku don’t look that great compared to hosting it yourself, but you’d need to factor in the cost of support staff there.

Thanks for a great event!


* I decided to see for myself what extensions were available. Mark warned me “don’t shed too many tears for what they don’t have”. To my surprise, many of my favorites are available – pgperl, plpgsql, postgis, and tablefunc! (SO EXCITE MUCH PIVOT)

Check what’s available on your instance with this command:
SHOW rds.extensions;

Note that “SELECT * FROM pg_available_extensions ORDER BY name;” will show you a bunch of stuff that’s not necessarily available on RDS. (Something I wish they’d fix.)

8 September, 2014

Updating My Linux Command line Toolbox, episode 2

by gorthx

Part 1

Five more, all from this week:

1. date -u to get your date in UTC

2. pushd and popd – create your own directory stack.  I’m still trying this one out.  (“why not just use the up arrow?”)

3. pbcopy – copy to clipboard from the command line.

4. !$ contains the last arg of the previous command, so you can do something like this:
ls -l filename.*    # check what you have in the dir
vi !$

5. This one is my favorite: !?[string] runs last command that contains that string.

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